Personality types create a bias (conscious or unconscious) in the workplace.We need to be mindful of that bias when we recruit, promote, allocate work, and manage performance with filters on our thinking. We cannot change what we do not see or acknowledge, but we can alter conscious attitudes and beliefs.

Unconscious bias in the workplace can mean talented people are left out of your workforce or not allowed an equal opportunity for development and career progression. Diverse voices aren’t heard in meetings, and decisions can be impaired. Your culture is not genuinely demonstrating inclusive workplace principles. Employees are not able to fully contribute to your organization. Creativity and productivity of your team or organization may be compromised.

You can manage unconscious bias in your workplace byorganization awareness development, through attraction and selection processes, career development and talent management, work allocation, team dynamics, performance management, and community services.

Encourage your leadership team to understand the impact unconscious bias has on the workplace and the importance of interrupting it. Run an information session on how unconscious bias affects us, host an expert speaker, or build the topic into your leadership programs.Examine your workforce demographics for equity issues that appear in the statistics based on either gender, age, ability, or ethnicity.Conduct employee surveys or run employee focus groups (women, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, new Australians, people with a disability, mature-aged employees) to find out if they have witnessed unconscious bias and what impact it has on their employment experience.

Practice mindfulness to reduce your stress levels and slow down your thinking processes. Being more deliberate in your decision making can reduce your propensity towards unconscious bias.

Trial and assess recruitment processes that are ‘blind.’ This is where documents (e.g., resumes and applications) have de-identified data, eliminating some of the known unconscious biases such as age, gender, where applicants are from, which university they attended, and so on. This is more difficult with a large number of applicants but worth exploring to see if recruitment around diversity outcomes changes.

Advertise roles in a broad section of places that diverse groups look for new jobs. Use inclusive language in your advertising content and actively encourage different applications.Train your selection panel members to be aware of their unconscious biases by completing the Harvard Implicit Association Test.

Create your succession plans with at least 2 ‘go-to’ people (those who can easily step up when leaders are away or unavailable). Make sure 1 is a woman or from a minority group.Support the development of future female leaders or those from diverse backgrounds by creating a mentoring program specifically to unleash their potential.Cover inclusive leadership skills when developing leadership programs.

Helping managers understand they are more likely to assign projects to individuals who they have an unconscious affinity with can be the first step. You can encourage managers to take risks and allocate work to different people.Set up a team meeting structure that supports diverse voices, by including round-robin updates where everyone gets an equal say, and different people can assume the role of the chair. Run an awareness program for your team that uncovers unconscious biases in the workplace, label the biases that commonly occur, and discuss how you can be more mindful about overcoming them.

When managers have an unconscious affinity with an employee, they often spend more time with them informally, discussing their contributions, development, and career plans. For those they have little relationship with, managers are more likely to query past performance, and the conversations are often less friendly.

Building design innovation capability in your team or organization can help you create solutions with diverse community needs in mind. When dealing with complex problems, you are better off co-designing with a wide range of stakeholders, so your solution overcomes unconscious bias tendencies.

Helping managers understand they are more likely to assign projects to individuals who they have an unconscious affinity with can be the first step. You can encourage managers to take risks and allocate work to different people.Set up a team meeting structure that helps diverse voices, by including round-robin updates where everyone gets an equal say, and different people can assume the role of the chair

Run an awareness program for your team that uncovers unconscious biases in the workplace, label the biases that commonly occur, and discuss how you can be more mindful about overcoming them.

[contact-form-7 404 "Not Found"]

[contact-form-7 404 "Not Found"]

[contact-form-7 404 "Not Found"]

[contact-form-7 404 "Not Found"]

[contact-form-7 404 "Not Found"]

[contact-form-7 404 "Not Found"]

[contact-form-7 404 "Not Found"]

[contact-form-7 404 "Not Found"]

[contact-form-7 404 "Not Found"]

[contact-form-7 404 "Not Found"]

[contact-form-7 404 "Not Found"]

[contact-form-7 404 "Not Found"]

[contact-form-7 404 "Not Found"]

[contact-form-7 404 "Not Found"]

[contact-form-7 404 "Not Found"]

[contact-form-7 404 "Not Found"]

[contact-form-7 404 "Not Found"]

[contact-form-7 404 "Not Found"]

[contact-form-7 404 "Not Found"]

[contact-form-7 404 "Not Found"]

[contact-form-7 404 "Not Found"]

[contact-form-7 404 "Not Found"]

[contact-form-7 404 "Not Found"]

[contact-form-7 404 "Not Found"]

 

[contact-form-7 404 "Not Found"]